November 3, 2022
Presentations to 42 Students at Hamilton-Wenham Regional High School

Over the past two days, we’ve presented to 42 students at Hamilton-Wenham Regional High School, where Nan and our Executive Director, Jake, attended as teens. It was great to open up conversations about these tough topics, and connect with a teacher who shared stories of Jake and Nan when they were younger. We will be back next week with group activities focused on positive coping strategies for students at Hamilton-Wenham!

November 1, 2022
Presentations to 125 Students at Greater Lowell Tech

Today we returned to Greater Lowell Technical High School and presented to125 students! Many students had questions about therapy and our Peer Mentors were happy to share their experiences and provide information on how to access mental health support. Thank you again to Ms. Fenlon for welcoming us back and for the incredible lunch at Greater Lowell Tech’s student-operated restaurant: The Artisan!

 

October 31, 2022
Peer Mentor Graduation at YouForward Lawrence

Today we wrapped up our Peer Mentor training at YouForward Lawrence! We welcome our new members onto the team and look forward to them joining our upcoming presentations.

October 28, 2022
Active Listening at Galvin Middle School’s A Time to Talk

Today we held our 4th session of A Time to Talk at Galvin Middle School in Wakefield! Today’s group was focused on active listening. We played simon says, practiced listening with a paired activity, stacked cups reflecting risk and protective factors, and our Peer Mentor; Nyatuga, shared her comeback story. We’re excited to return for more learning and fun activities next week!

October 25, 2022
Presentations to 122 Students at Greater Lowell Technical High School

Today our team presented to 122 students at Greater Lowell Technical High School! We were so impressed with the questions students asked about mental health, therapy, trusted adults, and how to help a friend that is struggling. We also had the pleasure of dining for lunch at their student-operated restaurant: The Artisan – it was quite the treat!  A big thank you to Ms. Fenlon for welcoming us into her classroom once again. We look forward to speaking to more students at Greater Lowell Tech next week!

October 21, 2022
Managing Responses to Stress at Galvin Middle School

At the third session of A Time to Talk at Galvin Middle School in Wakefield today, we discussed positive, tolerable, and toxic stress as a group, played the “ABCs of Coping Skills,” and ended with mindful movement. We’re excited to come back next week to play some games centered on active listening!

October 20, 2022
A Night for NAN 2022
We had an amazing turnout of over 200 people at A Night for NAN!! Thank you, thank you, thank you to everyone who joined, bid in the silent auction, organized, and helped us make the night a huge success! An especially big thanks to our guest of honor State Representative Michael Day for his immense support in continuing our important suicide prevention work in his district and beyond. And our new Peer Coordinators April and Sarojini hit it out of the park with their powerful Comeback Stories and demonstrated what our work is all about!
 
We appreciate Danversport for hosting this event and providing such a beautiful venue. In addition, we want to give kudos to our generous sponsors: BIMSHA, Capital Lease Group, Ltd., The Dalton/Cavanaugh Family, Marsh & Mclennan, Starkweather & Shepley Insurance Brokerage, Inc., Hosted Telecom Solutions, Inc., Jennifer Miller and Victor Paci, Charles and Zalena Senatore, Bank of America, Thrive, WellSense Health Plan, formerly BMC HealthNet Plan, Facilico, Eastern Bank, Devaney Energy, T-Mobile, Beacon Pointe, J.O.S Staffing, and William Berry at Wealth Planning Resources.
October 18, 2022
“It’s OK to Leave” – Living with a Mental Health Challenge Vignette

“It’s Okay to Leave” written by John Oxenford with Illustrations Designed by Alison Sabean


The following vignette is about a person who is experiencing symptoms from their mental illness, but is nevertheless able to persist, and manage their mental health challenges. Voice 1 represents the character’s fears that limit them from being able to accomplish their goals that day. Feelings and struggles, similar to those that this person is experiencing from their mental illness (Voice 1), can drive someone towards suicidal thinking. Thoughts like these can inhibit a person from being able to live a stable life, due to their consistent fears and repetitive irrational thoughts. The thoughts that this character is experiencing stem from a reasonable place, such as, wanting to ensure everything is set in a person’s home before they face the day, however, in this character’s case the thoughts are exaggerated out of proportion, and thus become invasive and limiting. Even though this person has checked all of the things that they needed to check, thoroughly and efficiently, in order to be able to start their day, their fear is still there and thus creating an intrusive barrier, causing them to assume that for some reason what they have done is not enough. Voice 2 represents the part of the protagonist’s mind that is uninhibited by their unsubstantiated fears and doubts, in other words their rational mind. The conversations happening between the protagonist and their voices represent an internal struggle many people with mental health face on a regular basis, as they work to manage their mental health. I hope this scene gives hope to people who are going through similar struggles – and might even be experiencing suicidal thoughts. This scene was created to give hope, and the understanding that struggles can be overcome. 

It’s OK to Leave

Characters: 

Girl, early 20s

Voice 1 representing Girl’s negative thoughts

Voice2 representing Girl’s positive thoughts 

 

Scene: 

A small apartment. It is simply furnished but immaculate. Everything in its place, not a speck of dust. Music plays through stereo speakers mounted on the bookcase.

 

Girl is packing her backpack for the gym. She puts a water bottle in the outside pocket, then checks each pocket. She puts the pack down and goes into the kitchen. She walks slowly round inspecting all the appliances—toaster, fridge, microwave. Stops at the stove, checks that each dial is set to off, checks each burner to make sure it’s cold. She does this several times, then stops, takes a breath.

 

Girl [as if about to do a parachute jump]: OK, ready to go.

 

She walks to the door. Her hand is on the knob. She’s about to turn it when–

 

Voice 1 (offstage): Haven’t you forgotten something?  

 

Girl: Um . . . No?

 

Voice 1: What about the stove? You forgot to check the stove.

 

Girl [less certain]: No, I’m pretty sure I checked it all.

 

Voice 1 enters upstage right. The stage lights begin to dim. 

 

Voice 1[sinister, slightly threatening]: Well I’m pretty sure you missed something. Check again!

 

Girl [moving toward the kitchen]: I—I thought I checked it. I thought I checked it really well.

 

Voice 1: You thought? But you’re not sure. What if there’s a fire. Do you want to take that risk? They’d evict you. People could be killed. Check again. Properly this time.

Illustration designed by Alison Sabean

Girl goes over to the stove, repeats the checks she did before but takes much longer. Visibly nervous.

This interchange is repeated several times, until the girl, now very stressed, runs to the door, grabs the knob, turns it.

 

Voice 1: Are you really going? You’re willing to take the risk? What if—

The lights flicker. Sound of glass shattering, a siren, people running and shouting. 

 

Girl: [screams] Stop! Stop! Leave me alone!

Voice 1 disappears. She drops onto the couch, head in hands. 

 

Voice 2 enters upstage left. A faint light shows. 

 

Voice2: Why are you sitting there? I thought you were going to the gym today.

 

Girl: I can’t.

 

Voice 2: Why not?

 

Girl: Because—I don’t know. It just doesn’t feel . . . safe.

 

Voice2: Safe? How do you mean?

 

Girl: What if I went out and I’d left a burner on and there was a fire? They’d evict me. People could be killed. 

 

Voice2: But how could there be a fire? You checked the stove. Every burner. Lots of times. The stove is fine.

Illustration designed by Alison Sabean

Lights begin to come up. Girl sits up, looks around her, as if seeing her apartment for the first time. Takes a breath. Laughs. 

 

Girl: The stove is fine! I checked it! Lots of times!

 

She gets her backpack, walks straight to the door, leaves without a backward glance.

 

Voice1 enters.

Voice1: Have you checked the—

Sees there’s no one there 

Lights out.

 

Presentations to Swampscott High School and YouForward Training

Over today and yesterday, we presented to over 50 students at Swampscott High School! We had some great conversations around the impact of bullying and how to foster good self-esteem in yourself and those you care for. We also began a Peer Mentor training at YouForward Lawrence over the past two days. We look forward to learning more about our new trainees and hearing their stories!

October 14, 2022
The NAN Project Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month 2022

Written by Karla Flores and Mia Celeste Sheets

Cesar Chavez, the Mexican American labor leader and civil rights activist, said, “preservation of one’s own culture does not require contempt or disrespect for other cultures.” As we celebrate Hispanic/Latinx Heritage month in 2022, we not only uplift unique cultures, but we also want to take the time to recognize these cultural differences and what that may mean for the mental health of those in the Hispanic and Latinx communities. Hispanic Heritage Month takes place from September 15 to October 15 honoring the histories, cultures, and accomplishments of American citizens with ancestors who came from Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Spain. The observance was born in 1968, under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, with the approval of Public Law 100-402.

 

September 15 is significant as it is the anniversary of the five Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Both Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence on September 16 and September 18. It’s important to understand there is great diversity within this community, where people are connected by shared cultural values regardless of race, ancestry, or national origin. The identities and diverse cultures within the Hispanic and Latinx communities are as rich and complex as their history. Typically, those who identify as Latino, Latina, Latine, or Latinx may consider themselves of Latin American descent (Central America, South America, or the Caribbean), and those who identify as Hispanic may be referring to ancestry from Spain or other Spanish-speaking countries. While the two terms may share overlap, not everyone believes these terms can be used interchangeably to mean the same thing and will instead refer to their country of origin instead of as “Hispanic” or “Latinx”, however, members of the population may use different terms interchangeably.

 

Through Mental Health America research, over 18.3% of the U.S. population is estimated to be Latinx or Hispanic, which is about 62.1 million people in the United States. Of those, over 16% reported having a mental illness in the past year. That is over 10 million people, more than the number of people who live in New York City! Hispanic Heritage Month also overlaps with September’s Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and October’s Depression Awareness Month, so here at The NAN Project, we wanted to take this opportunity to extend the dialogue surrounding mental health within the Hispanic and Latinx communities. Similar to the way Hispanic culture creates a unique environment for members of the population to show strength and resilience, there are also specific barriers to gaining access to mental health support like financial and language barriers, access to insurance, legal status, lack of cultural competency, stigma, and machismo. These aspects are particular to Hispanic and Latinx culture, which we’d like to recognize, discuss, and provide resources that are working to overcome these barriers. 

 

Financial barriers can affect anyone’s ability to access mental health treatment. According to a research article concerning residents of Washington Heights, New York City, where the population is 67.9% is Hispanic or Latino, “those who experienced financial barriers to mental health care had significantly higher depressive symptoms in comparison to those who could afford mental health care” (Pabayo R et al Financial Barriers to Mental Healthcare Services and Depressive Symptoms among Residents of Washington Heights, New York City. Hispanic Health Care International). We know that one factor that impacts financial access is access to health insurance. One in four Latinos do not have health insurance, and while the Affordable Care Act has narrowed racial gaps in access to healthcare, Latinos are still nearly 3 times more likely to be uninsured than non-Hispanic whites. Many are not aware of the Affordable Care Act eligible for children of undocumented immigrants they can access, and individuals without legal status may not seek or register for mental health services due to fear of separation or deportation, an adding a barrier to access to care. 

 

For those who do have financial capabilities to seek professional mental health care, there may be difficulty in finding a provider who understands them either linguistically, culturally, or both. According to Census data, there are only about 5,000 psychologists in the United States who are Hispanic, representing less than 6 percent of all psychologists. In a nationwide APA survey, only 5.5 percent of psychologists, who may be Hispanic or of another race or ethnicity, said they can provide services in Spanish, making them a rare commodity. In addition, only 6.4% of therapists in the United States are Hispanic or Latinx. Symptoms, as they are described in the Hispanic and Latinx communities, can often be misunderstood by mental health providers or lead to a misdiagnosis of individuals as they have their language as well as differences in beliefs, lifestyles, and customs. A common example is how the word “nervios” in Spanish can be used to describe physical illness and can be symptoms of depression but a mental health professional can still misdiagnose them by misunderstanding this word to describe symptoms of anxiety (NAMI website).

 

Seeking mental health treatment requires acknowledging that there is a need to do so, which can present its own challenge to members of the Hispanic or Latinx community, due to added stigma surrounding mental health challenges within the community. When it comes to discussing symptoms and recognizing mental health challenges, these can be hard to identify, because Latinx/Hispanic people will often focus on physical symptoms and not psychiatric symptoms during doctor visits. This can also be because there is a common perception in Latinx/Hispanic communities, especially among older people, that discussing problems with mental health can create embarrassment and shame for the family, resulting in fewer people seeking treatment. It can be hard to shift an entire community’s temperament and would require these beliefs to be challenged over time. This is most prevalent amongst older generations due to a lack of acculturation. The level of a person’s acculturation is how thoroughly they have embraced or adopted the predominant culture of the place they live, which can play a role in mental health and access to care. Acculturation has been found to predict an increased willingness to use mental health care services between first and second-generation immigrants from various cultural backgrounds.

 

Despite this, according to SAMHSA’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health, overall mental health issues are on the rise for Latinx/Hispanic people between the ages of 12-49. Major depressive episodes increased from 12.6 percent to 15.1 percent in Latinx/Hispanic youth ages 12-17, from 8 percent to 12 percent in young adults 18-25 age range between 2015 and 2018. This reinforces the importance of increasing access and creating more dialogue around mental health that does not create further stigma but instead normalizes the discussion and encourages seeking treatment for mental health challenges. 

 

Mental health stigma has many layers in the Hispanic community, one of which is known as machismo. The term “machismo” has been described as the belief that you must be able to provide for your family despite any pain or hardship the man endures. Latino men even go to the extremes of avoiding going to the doctor because it is seen as a sign of weakness. In a study, one Latino man said, “[In] machismo we are taught that the men always had to be strong. . . The man doesn’t cry, the man is the provider of the family, the man shouldn’t complain, and the man doesn’t go to the doctor.” Similarly across many minority and immigrant communities, there is a phenomenon known as the “Eldest Daughter Syndrome” that is extremely prevalent amongst the first-born daughters of immigrants. The high pressure to succeed in an environment different from their parents and set a good example for their younger siblings, can lead to anxiety, depression, and other mental health challenges. Some feel burdened with the responsibility of taking care of their younger siblings and at a very young age they adopt more of a maternal role in their family system, adding stress to their critical developmental stages of life. 

 

Despite these obstacles and challenges, the Hispanic/Latinx community continues to show strength and resilience. This year’s theme in celebrating Hispanic Heritage is Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation. Here at The NAN Project, we also recognize these barriers and are actively trying to provide support to overcome them. We work with schools, organizations, and people in the community to educate and bring awareness surrounding mental health. We recognize that inclusivity doesn’t just look like bringing equal access to resources to various communities, but also identifying what one specific community’s needs are and understanding what we can offer to fill those needs. By bringing our work, support, expertise, and resources to schools and community centers that are predominantly Hispanic, the goal is to bridge the gap between mental health and what it means to be part of the Latinx community. Understanding how they correlate to each other is the first step in improving on the lack of access and stigma that prevents people from seeking the treatment they need. 

 

Please visit The NAN Project website for a Resource Guide regarding Mental Health Resources hotlines with trained operators who are available 24/7 to help you find support.

 

Also, check out local organizations here in Massachusetts working closely with our Hispanic/Latinx communities!

 

  • La Colaborativa is a human services organization in Chelsea that provides social services and programming to Latinx immigrants like language courses, career training, citizenship support, and distributes food to families in the communities. https://la-colaborativa.org/ 
  • Eliot Family Resource Center (FRC) in Everett supports families with youth who are at-risk of needing court involvement because of their behaviors. FRC helps families find resources regarding housing support, education, utility assistance, legal help, summer camps, sports leagues,and more. https://www.eliotchs.org/family-resource-center/ 
  • UTEC in Lowell helps young adults through street outreach, violence intervention, programming at correctional facilities, social reintegration, transitional coaching, workforce development, mental health services, and more. https://utecinc.org/ 
  • CTI YouthBuild of Greater Lowell helps young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who have dropped out of high school and provides opportunities like G.E.D. preparation, vocational training, one on one case management, leadership development, life skills training, and career and academic coaching.
  • Roxbury YouthWorks INC helping youth struggling with victimization, poverty and violence transition successfully into adulthood. Services provided are bringing to commercial sexual exploitation of children, work with law enforcement, child-serving public agencies, and other non-profits to help reintagrate youth from court-ordered detention and treatment facilities back into society. http://www.roxburyyouthworks.org/ 
  • The Boston Alliance of LGBTQ Youth (BAGLY) is a youth-led, adult-supported social support organization, committed to social justice and creating, sustaining, and advocating for programs, policies, and services for the LGBTQ+ youth community.  https://www.bagly.org/ 
  • YouForward in Lawrence and Everett supports young adults ages 16 to 25 who are experiencing mental health challenges through mentoring, achieving goals, and helping discover talents and use it to inspire others.  http://youforward.org/ 
  • The Center for Hope is a Rape Crisis Center in Lowell with a goal to deliver multicultural and inclusive approaches to reach those who have historically have not been adequately served (i.e. limited English speakers, LGBQ/T folks, refugees and immigrants, children, youth, people with disabilities, etc) and also provide different programs for survivors as well as youth prevention groups. https://chhinc.org/ 

 

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